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What #Millennials want in a #homeforsale

Research has lead us to info on what Millennials might want in a new home:


1. Environmental designs delivers in small spaces

Millennials are creative when it comes to creative solutions for outdoor spaces. They embrace outdoor living. They want fire pits and fireplaces outdoors as well as vegetable beds and love the idea of growing their own food.

2. Environmentally friendly choices

Millennials will opt to use recyclable materials because it is the responsible choice.

3. They love landscaping

This group is fine with landscaping as they love to spend most of their time outdoors. Smartphone apps that can control irrigation and lighting systems are a must.

4. Not really into pools, hot tubs, and water features.

They are expensive and high on water usage. Spending so much time outdoors they don't want anything that will inhibit their weekend travel plans because of their regular maintenance schedule.

5. Playtime

Would rather meet at a nearby park than have a big bulky playset in their yard. Prefer "nature play" - big boulders and logs to let imaginations run wild.

6. Modern aesthetic lines

Barn doors, copper trim, and uneven lines are too busy and clutter the spaces. Preference of several different materials overtakes the traditional ones.

Brought to you by the Chris Fritch Team Keller Williams Classic Realty 763-746-3997

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